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Chateau Lafleur 2009

Bordeaux Red Blends from Pomerol, Bordeaux, France
  • JS100
  • RP99
  • ST98
  • WS95
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Winemaker Notes

Critical Acclaim

JS 100
James Suckling

This is a crazy nose of tangerines and blueberries, with raspberries and mushroom and berries. Full-bodied, with ultra fine tannins. This wine is all about texture, with phenomenal tannins and subtle fruits that just make you think. Evocative. It is layered, yet changes all the time. I can't believe it really. Speechless. Amazes me. Try in 2020.

RP 99
The Wine Advocate

An absolutely prodigious blend of 55% Cabernet Franc and 45% Merlot, the 2009 Lafleur displays the tell-tale characteristics of this great estate. Kirsch liqueur, licorice and floral notes are intermixed with raspberry in a very full-bodied, super-intense, opulent and multi-dimensional style. Extraordinarily dense and pure, but not heavy by any means, the intensity, texture, and richness of the 2009 Lafleur are reminiscent of the perfect 1982. Anticipated maturity: 2018-2040.

ST 98
International Wine Cellar

(53% cabernet franc and 47% merlot) Medium-deep ruby. The complex, captivating nose shows a prominent cabernet franc presence, with enticing aromas of strawberry, violet, cocoa, minerals and white pepper. Enters broad, luscious and fresh, displaying well-delineated flavors of sweet redcurrant and strawberry complemented by a note of spicy red cherry reduction sauce and more white pepper. Boasts an amazingly rich and tactile mouth feel and comes across as far smoother than the estate's second wine Pensees de Lafleur, which showed quite a bit of tannins for its fruit. Finishes with palate-staining persistence and great purity and precision. One of the masterpieces of the vintage. I also tasted in this cellar in December, and the uncanny quality of the cabernet franc was already apparent.

WS 95
Wine Spectator

This gushes with mouthwatering blueberry, boysenberry and blackberry fruit, leading to a long black tea- and incense-filled finish. Darkens up considerably as it airs, with layers of extra flesh, Kenya AA coffee and charcoal notes striding through the finish. Shows an exotic side, and gorgeous mouthfeel. Best from 2015 through 2030.

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Chateau Lafleur

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Chateau Lafleur, , France - Bordeaux
Chateau Lafleur
The chateaux of Pomerol were never officially classified but Chateau Lafleur is one of the top quality properties in Pomerol. It is perhaps the only chateau in Pomerol that can rival Chateau Petrus.

Pinot Noir

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One of the most difficult yet rewarding grapes to grow...

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One of the most difficult yet rewarding grapes to grow, Pinot Noir is commonly referred to by winemakers as the “heartbreak grape.” However, the greatest red wines of Burgundy prove that it is unquestionably worth the effort. More reflective than most varieties of the land on which it is grown, Pinot Noir prefers a cool climate, requires low yields to achieve high quality, and demands care in the vineyard and lots of attention in the winery. It is an important component of Champagne and the only variety permitted in red Burgundy. Pinot Noir enjoys immense popularity internationally, most notably in Oregon, California, and New Zealand.

In the Glass

Pinot Noir Is all about red fruit—strawberry, raspberry, and cherry. It is relatively pale in color with soft tannins and lively acidity. It ranges in body from very light to the heavier side of medium, typically landing somewhere in the middle—giving it extensive possibilities for food pairing. With age (of which the best examples can handle an astounding amount), it can develop hauntingly beautiful characteristics of fresh earth, autumn leaves, and truffles.

Perfect Pairings

Pinot’s healthy acidity cuts through the oiliness of pink-fleshed fish like salmon, ocean trout, and tuna. Its mild mannered tannins don’t fight with spicy food, and give it enough structure to pair with all sorts of poultry—chicken, quail, and especially duck. As the namesake wine of Boeuf Bourguignon, it can even match with heavier fare. Pinot Noir is also very vegetarian-friendly—most notably with any dish that features mushrooms.

Sommelier Secret

Pinot Noir is dangerously drinkable, highly addictive, and has a bad habit of emptying the wallet. Look for affordable but still delicious examples from Germany (as Spätburgunder), Italy (as Pinot Nero), Chile, New Zealand, and France’s Loire Valley and Alsace regions.