Familia Salton Intenso Brut Rose  Front Label
Familia Salton Intenso Brut Rose  Front LabelFamilia Salton Intenso Brut Rose  Front Bottle Shot

Familia Salton Intenso Brut Rose

  • WW90
750ML / 11.5% ABV
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750ML / 11.5% ABV

Winemaker Notes

Bright, with a delicate pinkish color, with abundant detachment of fine bubbles. Fruity aroma, with notes of citrus and small fresh red fruits. Fresh, creamy and delicate.

Pair with canapes, light risottos and fish.

Blend: 60% Pinot Noir, 40% Trebbiano

Critical Acclaim

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WW 90
Wilfred Wong of Wine.com
COMMENTARY: The Salton Intenso Sparkling Rosé is lively, bright, and tart. TASTING NOTES: This wine exhibits aromas and flavors of tangy red fruit that last long into the finish. Try it with fresh raw salmon and avocado handrolls. (Tasted: August 18, 2022, San Francisco, CA)
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Familia Salton

Familia Salton

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Familia Salton, Brazil
Familia Salton Cellar Door of Salton Winery Winery Image

This story begins in Italy, in 1878, when Antonio Domenico Salton left the town of Cison di Valmarino, in the Veneto region, searching for better opportunities in Brazil. He settled in the Italian colony of Vila Isabel, today known as the city of Bento Gonçalves, in Rio Grande do Sul state, Brazil.

The company was formally established in 1910, when the brothers Paulo, Angelo, João, José, Cesar, Luis and Antonio gave an entrepreneurial touch to the business of their father, the Italian immigrant Antonio Domenico Salton, who made wine informally, like most Italian immigrants did that time. The brothers started to cultivate grapes and produce wines, sparkling wines and vermouths, under the name “Paulo Salton & Irmãos”, in the downtown of Bento Gonçalves city.

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Portugese colonists brought wine producing grapes to Brazil as far back as the mid 16th century but the mainly humid, tropical environment proved to be a challenge for the early settlers. Though it is a large country, only a small portion, towards its southern end near Uruguay, is within the ideal latitudes for wine production. Brazil has about the same acreage under vine as its South American wine-producing neighbors, Chile and Argentina, but most of it is for table grapes. About 10% of the land is Vitis vinifera, the wine producing species.

Brazil has enjoyed consistent quality advancements since the 1970s and 1980s, largely due to investments by international wine companies, namely Moet & Chandon, Seagram, Bacardi, Domecq and Martini & Rossi. Serra Gaucha, a southerly coastal region of low mountains, recognized for sparkling wine production, is Brazil’s key wine region. Campanha, its neighbor, is attracting more attention for its red wines (Cabernet and Tannat) and white wines (Chardonnay).

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What are the different types of sparkling rosé wine?

Rosé sparkling wines like Champagne, Prosecco, Cava, and others make a fun and festive alternative to regular bubbles—but don’t snub these as not as important as their clear counterparts. Rosé Champagnes (i.e., those coming from the Champagne region of France) are made in the same basic way as regular Champagne, from the same grapes and the same region. Most other regions where sparkling wine is produced, and where red grape varieties also grow, also make a rosé version.

How is sparkling rosé wine made?

There are two main methods to make rosé sparkling wine. Typically, either white wine is blended with red wine to make a rosé base wine, or only red grapes are used but spend a short period of time on their skins (maceration) to make rosé colored juice before pressing and fermentation. In either case the base wine goes through a second fermentation (the one that makes the bubbles) through any of the various sparkling wine making methods.

What gives rosé Champagne and sparkling wine their color and bubbles?

The bubbles in sparkling wine are formed when the base wine undergoes a secondary fermentation, which traps carbon dioxide inside the bottle or fermentation vessel. During this stage, the yeast cells can absorb some of the wine’s color but for the most part, the pink hue remains.

How do you serve rosé sparkling wine?

Treat rosé sparkling wine as you would treat any Champagne, Prosecco, Cava, and other sparkling wine of comparable quality. For storing in any long-term sense, these should be kept at cellar temperature, about 55F. For serving, cool to about 40F to 50F. As for drinking, the best glasses have a stem and a flute or tulip shape to allow the bead (bubbles) and beautiful rosé hue to show.

How long do rosé Champagne and sparkling wine last?

Most rosé versions of Prosecco, Champagne, Cava or others around the “$20 and under” price point are intended for early consumption. Those made using the traditional method with extended cellar time before release (e.g., Champagne or Crémant) can typically improve with age. If you are unsure, definitely consult a wine professional for guidance.

MTF14441_NV_0 Item# 979806

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