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Gaja Sori San Lorenzo 2009

Nebbiolo from Piedmont, Italy
  • RP96
  • WE96
  • JS96
  • ST95
  • WS93
Ships Fri, Jul 28
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Winemaker Notes

Deep red in color, with highly concentrated aromas of currant and black cherry fruit with a hint of coffee. Also, aromas of fine herbs, minerals and exotic spices. Almost always the most powerful and austere of Gaja's five single-vineyard wines, requiring a longer time to fully develop. A very focused, concentrated wine with a long, lingering finish and refined tannins, it has excellent aging potential.

Critical Acclaim

RP 96
The Wine Advocate

Gaja's 2009 Sori San Lorenzo, on the other hand, is much more typical in its expression. Layers of juicy dark cherries, menthol, spices, tar, licorice and graphite flow across the palate as this powerful, masculine wine opens up in the glass. Balsamic infused aromas and flavors develop in the glass, adding considerable complexity and the signature of this great terroir, indisputably one of Piemonte's very finest. Anticipated maturity: 2019-2039.

WE 96
Wine Enthusiast

There's always something magical about Gaja's Sorì San Lorenzo. It’s the intensity and fullness of the wine that penetrates to the back of the palate and offers many long minutes of persistency on the finish. The bouquet is redolent of black fruit, leather, spice, tar, licorice and dried herb.

JS 96
James Suckling

Subtle and rich with raspberry and blueberry aromas and touches of peaches and lavender too. Full-bodied, with intense lavender and spice character with chocolate and fruit flavors. Long, long finish.

ST 95
International Wine Cellar

Good full red. Pungent aromas of maraschino cherry, minerals, smoke and camphor; the most Barolo-like of Gaja's 2009s from the Barbaresco zone. The thickest and most concentrated too, sweet and mouthfilling but very backward. The combination of sheer stuffing and medicinal reserve along with fine-grained, dusty tannins and outstanding persistence suggests that this plump but youthful wine will age slowly and well.

WS 93
Wine Spectator

A rich, muscular style, with black cherry, plum, smoke and spice aromas and flavors holding court. Balanced and smooth, in a modern style, showing refinement and length on the finish. Best from 2015 through 2027.

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Gaja, , Italy
Gaja
The story of the Gaja Winery can be traced to a singular, founding purpose: to produce original wines with a sense of place which reflect the tradition and culture of those who made it. This philosophy has inspired five generations of impeccable winemaking. It started over 150 years ago when Giovanni Gaja opened a small restaurant in Barbaresco, making wine to complement the food he served. In 1859, he founded the Gaja Winery, producing some... View More

With the potential to produce some of the finest white wines in the world...

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With the potential to produce some of the finest white wines in the world, Germany is one of the world’s most misunderstood winegrowing countries. Many wine consumers of a certain age will recall with amusement and a twinge of horror the sugar-laden Liebfraumilch of their formative drinking years, and surely these bulk-produced, saccharine bottles can still be found. But today Germany is building its reputation upon fine wines at all points of the spectrum from sweet to dry, the best of which can age for many decades. The world’s northernmost region for quality wine production, Germany faces some unique viticultural challenges due to its extreme marginal climate. Fortunately for the lover of German wine, because these wines are still a bit under the radar, they tend to remain surprisingly affordable—for now.

Germany is best known for white wines, particularly Riesling, which is cold-hardy enough to survive very chilly winters, and has enough natural acidity to create balanced wines even at the highest levels of residual sugar. These are classified by ripeness, and can be picked early for dry wines with searing acidity, or as late as January following the harvest for lusciously sweet ice wines. Other important white varieties include fairly neutral workhorse Müller-Thurgau as well as Grauburguner (Pinot Gris) and Weissburguner ([Pinot Blanc]). Spätburgunder (Pinot Noir) grown in warmer pockets of the country is, at its best, elegant and structured enough to rival red Burgundy.