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Kunde Estate Zinfandel 2006

Zinfandel from Sonoma County, California
  • W&S90
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Currently Unavailable $12.99
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Winemaker Notes

The 2006 Kunde Family Estate Zinfandel is one sneaky character. It starts out as a well-mannered and elegant claret-styled wine, but the spicy flavors seem to grow in your glass. The beautiful berry aromas follow up and keep on coming. Pork tenderloin with a spicy rub would be just the match for this beauty—well-mannered but a little bit wild. Watch out - you might find the bottle disappearing somehow!

Critical Acclaim

W&S 90
Wine & Spirits

Tight red fruit gives this wine a clean impression, carrying the warmth of its alcohol with grace. It’s lean, with a quinine-like bitterness to the tannin that keeps the fruit in check. Decant it for grilled lamb kabobs.

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Kunde Estate Winery

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Kunde Estate Winery, , California
Kunde
Since the early 1900s, five generations of the Kunde family have preserved the family tradition of farming their fertile, highly praised vineyards located in the heart of the Sonoma Valley. Their picturesque 2000-acre estate has been planted with 800 acres of wine grapes, the vast majority of which are now used to create the Kunde's entire line of hand crafted, ultra-premium wines. Their 100% estate grown varietals include Chardonnay, Cabernet Sauvignon, Merlot, Zinfandel, Sauvignon Blanc, Syrah and Viognier.

Pinot Noir

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One of the most difficult yet rewarding grapes to grow...

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One of the most difficult yet rewarding grapes to grow, Pinot Noir is commonly referred to by winemakers as the “heartbreak grape.” However, the greatest red wines of Burgundy prove that it is unquestionably worth the effort. More reflective than most varieties of the land on which it is grown, Pinot Noir prefers a cool climate, requires low yields to achieve high quality, and demands care in the vineyard and lots of attention in the winery. It is an important component of Champagne and the only variety permitted in red Burgundy. Pinot Noir enjoys immense popularity internationally, most notably in Oregon, California, and New Zealand.

In the Glass

Pinot Noir Is all about red fruit—strawberry, raspberry, and cherry. It is relatively pale in color with soft tannins and lively acidity. It ranges in body from very light to the heavier side of medium, typically landing somewhere in the middle—giving it extensive possibilities for food pairing. With age (of which the best examples can handle an astounding amount), it can develop hauntingly beautiful characteristics of fresh earth, autumn leaves, and truffles.

Perfect Pairings

Pinot’s healthy acidity cuts through the oiliness of pink-fleshed fish like salmon, ocean trout, and tuna. Its mild mannered tannins don’t fight with spicy food, and give it enough structure to pair with all sorts of poultry—chicken, quail, and especially duck. As the namesake wine of Boeuf Bourguignon, it can even match with heavier fare. Pinot Noir is also very vegetarian-friendly—most notably with any dish that features mushrooms.

Sommelier Secret

Pinot Noir is dangerously drinkable, highly addictive, and has a bad habit of emptying the wallet. Look for affordable but still delicious examples from Germany (as Spätburgunder), Italy (as Pinot Nero), Chile, New Zealand, and France’s Loire Valley and Alsace regions.