Spice Route Chakalaka 2018  Front Label
Spice Route Chakalaka 2018  Front LabelSpice Route Chakalaka 2018  Front Bottle Shot

Spice Route Chakalaka 2018

  • WS90
750ML / 14.1% ABV
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3.9 6 Ratings
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3.9 6 Ratings
750ML / 14.1% ABV

Winemaker Notes

The 2018 Chakalaka consists of 6 grape varieties blended to produce a wine expressive of place. Each variety contributes in a different way to create this exciting wine.

Silky and smooth with hints of blackcurrant, cherry and plums. This blend of six varietals truly reflects the terroir of the Swartland.

The perfect food wine. Can hold up to the intense South African flavors of slow-roasted meat, especially barbequed pork. Even Asian inspired dishes with plum sauce will add to the fruitiness in the wine.

Blend: 27% Grenache, 26% Syrah, 22% Mataro, 11% Carignan, 8% Petite Sirah, 6% Tannat

Critical Acclaim

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WS 90
Wine Spectator

A fresh, medium-bodied red, with black cherry and boysenberry fruit flavors underscored by loamy earth and smoky mineral notes. Reveals hints of black licorice, mocha and dried sage on the chewy finish. Syrah, Mourvèdre, Grenache, Carignan, Durif and Tannat. Drink now.

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Spice Route

Spice Route

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Spice Route, South Africa
Spice Route Winery Image
Five centuries ago the ancient mariners braved uncharted seas to round the Cape in search of exotic spices. Their nerve and dash inspired Charles Back to found the Spice Route Winery in 1997. Charles had bought the farm Klein Amoskuil, and this Malmesbury based farm is now home to Spice Route's Swartland terroir styled wines. The Spice Route Winery has found its signature wine style in the warm rolling hills along the Cape West Coast. Matching traditional practices in the vineyards with modern, minimalist approaches in the cellar, they produce exceptionally ripe and deep-flavoured wines. The deep red soils sustain unirrigated bush vine through the long warm summers. These harsh conditions are tempered by cool Atlantic breezes rolling in overnight. In its few years since inception had a stratospheric climb into the top echelons of the South African wine industry.
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Swartland Wine

South Africa

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Literally meaning "the black land," Swartland takes its name from the endangered, indigenous "renosterbos" (translating to rhino bush), which used to be plentiful enough to turn the entire landscape a dark color certain during times of year. The district, attracting some of the most adventurous and least interventionist winemakers, excels in robust and full-bodied reds as well as quality fortified wines.

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With hundreds of red grape varieties to choose from, winemakers have the freedom to create a virtually endless assortment of blended red wines. In many European regions, strict laws are in place determining the set of varieties that may be used, but in the New World, experimentation is permitted and encouraged resulting in a wide variety of red wine styles. Blending can be utilized to enhance balance or create complexity, lending different layers of flavors and aromas. For example, a red wine blend variety that creates a fruity and full-bodied wine would do well combined with one that is naturally high in acidity and tannins. Sometimes small amounts of a particular variety are added to boost color or aromatics. Blending can take place before or after fermentation, with the latter, more popular option giving more control to the winemaker over the final qualities of the wine.

How to Serve Red Wine

A common piece of advice is to serve red wine at “room temperature,” but this suggestion is imprecise. After all, room temperature in January is likely to be quite different than in August, even considering the possible effect of central heating and air conditioning systems. The proper temperature to aim for is 55° F to 60° F for lighter-bodied reds and 60° F to 65° F for fuller-bodied wines.

How Long Does Red Wine Last?

Once opened and re-corked, a bottle stored in a cool, dark environment (like your fridge) will stay fresh and nicely drinkable for a day or two. There are products available that can extend that period by a couple of days. As for unopened bottles, optimal storage means keeping them on their sides in a moderately humid environment at about 57° F. Red wines stored in this manner will stay good – and possibly improve – for anywhere from one year to multiple decades. Assessing how long to hold on to a bottle is a complicated science. If you are planning long-term storage of your reds, seek the advice of a wine professional.

PRG002165_18_2018 Item# 921108

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