Szigeti Pinot Noir Brut Rose 2018  Front Label
Szigeti Pinot Noir Brut Rose 2018  Front LabelSzigeti Pinot Noir Brut Rose 2018  Front Bottle Shot

Szigeti Pinot Noir Brut Rose 2018

    750ML / 13.7% ABV
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    750ML / 13.7% ABV

    Winemaker Notes

    This sparkler is a brilliant salmon color with red gold highlights. Aromas of strawberries and red cherries carry through to the palate, which finishes with a lively acidity and a delicate mousse.

    Critical Acclaim

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    Szigeti

    Szigeti

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    Szigeti (pronounced ZIG-it-ee) was part of the new wave of Austrian sparkling wine producers in the 1990s who focused on high-quality, traditional method Sekt. The company began in 1991 when brothers Peter and Norbert Szigeti took over the family business in the village of Gols. Norbert trained in enology and worked in a large sparkling wine firm in Vienna, while Peter completed hotel management school and worked both in Austria and abroad. Szigeti operates as a négociant, buying fruit from contracted growers and owning no vineyards. A broad range of wines are produced, all by the traditional method, and all made in fresh style with clear varietal expression. In 2018, Peter Szigeti became the sole proprietor of the winery. 

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    Fog and humidity arise from the Neusiedlersee (lake), and extend over the wet flatlands region of the same name, all the way to Austria’s border with Hungary. This moisture, coupled with the daily sunshine that reflects from its wet surfaces, serves as the perfect environment for the development of the desirable fungus called, Botrytis cinerea.

    This fungus causes the grapes to essentially “rot” and dry, concentrating their sugars for harvest. It also helps the grapes develop intricate phenolic complexities leading to some of the most sought-after and unique sweet wines in the world. Austrian law categorizes these botrytized, sweet wines according to the must weight (sugar concentration) at harvest in the same way as the Germans. So the wines will be labeled, Auslese, Beerenauslese, Trockenbeerenauslese and Eiswein.

    While the region’s reputation has historically ridden on the success of its sweet, botrytized wines, in 2011, Austria granted the official appellation of origin, Neusiedlersee, to its high quality Zweigelt red wines. As a result, any of its prestigious sweet wines will be actually be labeled after the general region of Burgenland.

    Neusiedlersee’s slopes of mica, schist, limestone and variations in gravel, sand and clay make it ideal for its indigenous red varieties, Blaufränkisch, St. Laurent and Zwiegelt, as well as the international varieties of Pinot Noir (Blauburgunder), Merlot, Cabernet and even Syrah.

    Though not widely planted here, some white wines, such as Pinot Blanc (Weissburgunder), have distinguished themselves locally.

    Image for Sparkling Rosé Wine: Champagne, Prosecco & More content section

    What are the different types of sparkling rosé wine?

    Rosé sparkling wines like Champagne, Prosecco, Cava, and others make a fun and festive alternative to regular bubbles—but don’t snub these as not as important as their clear counterparts. Rosé Champagnes (i.e., those coming from the Champagne region of France) are made in the same basic way as regular Champagne, from the same grapes and the same region. Most other regions where sparkling wine is produced, and where red grape varieties also grow, also make a rosé version.

    How is sparkling rosé wine made?

    There are two main methods to make rosé sparkling wine. Typically, either white wine is blended with red wine to make a rosé base wine, or only red grapes are used but spend a short period of time on their skins (maceration) to make rosé colored juice before pressing and fermentation. In either case the base wine goes through a second fermentation (the one that makes the bubbles) through any of the various sparkling wine making methods.

    What gives rosé Champagne and sparkling wine their color and bubbles?

    The bubbles in sparkling wine are formed when the base wine undergoes a secondary fermentation, which traps carbon dioxide inside the bottle or fermentation vessel. During this stage, the yeast cells can absorb some of the wine’s color but for the most part, the pink hue remains.

    How do you serve rosé sparkling wine?

    Treat rosé sparkling wine as you would treat any Champagne, Prosecco, Cava, and other sparkling wine of comparable quality. For storing in any long-term sense, these should be kept at cellar temperature, about 55F. For serving, cool to about 40F to 50F. As for drinking, the best glasses have a stem and a flute or tulip shape to allow the bead (bubbles) and beautiful rosé hue to show.

    How long do rosé Champagne and sparkling wine last?

    Most rosé versions of Prosecco, Champagne, Cava or others around the “$20 and under” price point are intended for early consumption. Those made using the traditional method with extended cellar time before release (e.g., Champagne or Crémant) can typically improve with age. If you are unsure, definitely consult a wine professional for guidance.

    STC879787_2018 Item# 929712

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