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Clos du Caillou Chateauneuf-du-Pape Reserve 2006

Rhone Red Blends from Chateauneuf-du-Pape, Rhone, France
  • WS95
  • ST94
  • RP93
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Winemaker Notes

The reserve has a beautiful black robe with violet reflections. We discover a licorice nose, blueberry jam and wild myrtle associated with mocha. The mouth is ample, silky on black fruit, tobacco spices and powerful cloves. Final notes of cocoa bean.

Critical Acclaim

WS 95
Wine Spectator

Really packed but supersilky, with a gorgeous beam of raspberry ganache gliding over super fine-grained tannins, while notes of incense, blackberry preserve, bittersweet chocolate truffle and black tea fill in the background. Seamless and very long. Best from 2009 through 2030. 550 cases made.

ST 94
International Wine Cellar

Inky ruby. Alluring perfume of red and dark berries, cinnamon, incense and fresh flowers. Lush, creamy and sweet, offering palate-coating dark berry flavors and a sweet lavender pastille quality. Expands and gains depth and energy on the finish, leaving behind zesty cherry and berry skin and bitter chocolate notes. Extremely impressive and built to age.

RP 93
The Wine Advocate

Blueberry, blackberry, charcoal, licorice, and a touch of smoked meats are present in the 2006 Chateauneuf du Pape Clos du Caillou Reserve. It possesses the densest, most saturated color of the 2006s as well as abundant fruit, a full-bodied, powerful mouthfeel, a concentrated, multilayered texture, and a 40-45-second finish. A top-notch effort for the vintage, this beauty should age easily for 15+ years.

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Clos Du Caillou

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Clos Du Caillou, , France - Rhone
Clos du Caillou
"I recognize that I am one of the luckiest people in the world to have this job, and the privilege of tasting so many incredible wines, but certainly the efforts produced by Domaine du Caillou since 1998 rank among the most exciting I have ever tasted."
—Robert Parker, The Wine Advocate

From robust Côtes-du-Rhône to memorable Châteauneuf-du-Pape, Clos du Caillou wines arguably represent some of the finest values in all of France. Proprietor Sylvie Vacheron and winemaker... View More

Cabernet Sauvignon

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A noble variety bestowed with both power and concentration...

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A noble variety bestowed with both power and concentration, Cabernet Sauvignon is sometimes referred to as the “king” of red grapes. It can be somewhat unapproachable early in its youth but has the potential to age beautifully, with the ability to last fifty years or more at its best. Small berries and tough skins provide its trademark firm tannic grip, while high acidity helps to keep the wine fresh for decades. Cabernet Sauvignon flourishes in temperate climates like Bordeaux's Medoc region (and in St-Emillion and Pomerol, where it plays a supporting role to Merlot). The top Médoc producers use Cabernet Sauvignon for their wine’s backbone, blending it with Merlot and smaller amounts of Cabernet Franc, Malbec, and/or Petit Verdot. On its own, Cabernet Sauvignon has enjoyed great success throughout the world, particularly in the Napa Valley, and is responsible for some of the world’s most prestigious and sought-after “cult” wines.

In the Glass

High in color, tannin, and extract, Cabernet Sauvignon expresses notes of blackberry, cassis, plum, currant, spice, and tobacco. In Bordeaux and elsewhere in the Old World you'll find the more earthy, tannic side of Cabernet, where it's typically blended to soften tannins and add complexity. In warmer regions like California and Australia, you can typically expect more ripe fruit flavors upfront.

Perfect Pairings

Cabernet Sauvignon is right at home with rich, intense meat dishes—beef, lamb, and venison, in particular—where its opulent fruit and decisive tannins make an equal match to the dense protein of the meat. With a mature Cabernet, opt for tender, slow-cooked meat dishes.

Sommelier Secrets

Despite the modern importance and ubiquity of Cabernet Sauvignon, it is actually a relatively young variety. In 1997, DNA revealed the grape to be a spontaneous crossing of Cabernet Franc and Sauvignon Blanc which took place in 17th century southwestern France.